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The Bornean rainforest has always been home to both orangutans and humans. Save the Orangutan cooperates with BOS Foundation and Borneo Nature Foundation with grants from Civil Society in Development to ensure a place in nature for both humans, plants, and animals.

A marginalised people

The heavily marginalised indigenous people, the Dayaks, live in and around the Bornean rainforest. They are affected by sparse or non-existent infrastructure, poor education, and employment opportunities that are few and far between.

Rights and forest conservation

Save the Orangutan works to ensure that the indigenous people are aware of their rights to land and that they demand recognition of them. Most small indigenous farmers do not have formal rights to the land they cultivate, and their livelihoods are under constant pressure.

Environmental education

Save the Orangutan works to raise awareness of environmental considerations and sustainability in the local communities. Climate change and the depletion of natural resources have worsened the economic situation of the small indigenous farmers and fishermen.

Sustainable income sources

The local communities of Borneo are often driven to engage in illegal activities such as logging and mining when it is difficult to put food on the table. To counteract this, Save the Orangutan actively involves local communities in our projects. The orangutans at the rehabilitation centres are fed each day with hundreds of kilos of fruit sourced from local agriculture. Moreover, through our restoration project, we have established four seed nurseries that will supply over 100,000 tree seedlings for replanting and restoration projects.

Local anchoring

Our experiences prove the necessity to base projects on the villagers’ own needs to ensure a project’s success and sustainability. Additionally, it is crucial that the villagers, and not we, are the motor force behind the implementation of projects supported by Save the Orangutan.